August 8, 2012
nbcnews:

Clinton visits Mandela, 94, at home during African tour
(Photo: Jacquelyn Martin / AFP - Getty Images)
QUNU, South Africa - Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised the “beautiful” smile of her friend and former South African President Nelson Mandela when they met at his country home on Monday during her multi-nation trade and security tour through Africa.
Mandela, in failing health, has only seen a few visitors outside his family in recent years. During his 94th birthday celebration last month, the anti-apartheid leader met Hillary’s husband and former President Bill Clinton.
Read the complete story.

nbcnews:

Clinton visits Mandela, 94, at home during African tour

(Photo: Jacquelyn Martin / AFP - Getty Images)

QUNU, South Africa - Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised the “beautiful” smile of her friend and former South African President Nelson Mandela when they met at his country home on Monday during her multi-nation trade and security tour through Africa.

Mandela, in failing health, has only seen a few visitors outside his family in recent years. During his 94th birthday celebration last month, the anti-apartheid leader met Hillary’s husband and former President Bill Clinton.

Read the complete story.

(via sisterfrigidaire-deactivated201)

August 8, 2012

tomatoscout:

Song Festival

August 3, 2012
sfmoma:

elainer337:

7/30/2012 - morris and the sfmoma.

Dear Morris: your blue tie (scarf?) is dashing. We hope you enjoyed the museum. Love, SFMOMA.

sfmoma:

elainer337:

7/30/2012 - morris and the sfmoma.

Dear Morris: your blue tie (scarf?) is dashing. We hope you enjoyed the museum. Love, SFMOMA.

August 2, 2012

Edna Adan and the midwives she has trained talk about the need for more midwives in Somaliland for the Half the Sky movement. Formerly the first lady of Somaliland, Edna Adan founded the Edna Adan Hospital in Hargeisa, Somaliland after working for the World Health Organization. She is an inspiring advocate for women and girls, and her maternity hospital is a place of healing and care for Somaliland’s women. She is now training and dispatching 1,000 qualified midwives throughout the country. 

August 2, 2012

jetgirl78:

Gabrielle Douglas captures gold in the women’s gymnastics all-around competition. She becomes the first African-American woman to win this title and the first American woman to capture gold in both individual and team events in the same Olympics.

(via verycunninglinguist)

August 2, 2012

wellesleyunderground:

The Women in Public Service Project and Wellesley


Anyone who follows Wellesley news is no doubt aware of the college’s involvement with the Women in Public Service Project. The many articles featuring photos of Secretary Clinton have spoken of “training a new generation of women leaders,” and the media surrounding the dual appearance of Secretaries Albright and Clinton on the Alumnae Hall stage was impossible to miss. However, the focus on our illustrious alumnae only conveys one part of what the Project stands for. Many WU contributors have posted legitimate fears about the direction of the WPSP (its role in perpetrating Western hegemony, its narrow conception of leadership, and the hypocrisy of an American institution teaching anyone about political parity when we have such low rates of female representation) but the inaugural WPSP Institute, hosted by Wellesley this June, set a precedent that should assuage many of these concerns. I had the privilege of working at the Institute as an intern, and though it wasn’t perfect, I am confident that the model created this summer addresses these issues and could even help push the rest of Wellesley in the right direction.

Reading the delegates’ bios in preparation, I worried that it was presumptive to think the program would teach such accomplished women anything new, and that it might be insulting to try, but the Institute was well designed and emphasized exchange rather than instruction. The star-studded speakers list included established leaders from around the world, not just the United States, and from a wide range of disciplines. From Pakistani human rights lawyer Hina Jilani to Cambodian opposition leader Mu Sochua to Egyptian children’s rights activist Moushira Khattab to civil rights defender and Obama mentor Charles Ogletree (with a solid representation of Wellesley alums and professors including Lynn Sherr, Farahnaz Ispahani, Henrietta Holsman Fore, Jean Kilbourne, Amb. Michele Sison and our two Secretaries of State) panelists offered their expertise and support, and genuinely strove for dialogue. They shared their own stories, but the sessions served less as trainings than as platforms for an exchange of best practices, and an opportunity for delegates to ask questions of women and men who had been in the field for years. When representatives of institutions like the World Bank, USAID, the State Department and American NGOs did speak, it was largely to present the resources that were available through their organizations. And delegates were not shy about asking incisive and critical questions, forcing those representing Western interests to answer for inaction in Syria, poor development models, or unjust foreign policy double standards.


Many of the most interesting contributions came from the delegates themselves, all representing countries in transition -the majority from those affected by uprisings in the Arab world- and all with impressive resumes. At the closing ceremony, former congresswoman Jane Harman said she doubted “there could be more power on the planet than there is right here in this room.” Illustrative of her point was an exchange during one question and answer session. When a delegate introduced herself as “the youngest female parliamentarian,” others immediately cut in, saying “No, Wafa, I’m younger than you.” She clarified that she meant the youngest in Jordan, not in the room. But despite the abundance of parliamentarians, the Institute embraced a wider understanding of the meaning of ‘public service.’ From foreign relations to academia, engineering to law, urban planning to community organizing, and healthcare to entrepreneurship, the common denominator among delegates was determination and commitment to their communities rather than any sort of leadership benchmark. Though I disagree with some of Hailey’s points in her recent post about the Albright Institute, I think she is correct that Wellesley should broaden its conception of what it means to be a leader, and the 48 delegates who attended the WPSP Institute offer a wide range of alternative models. Among other things, they’ve faced death threats to run for office in Afghanistan, created apprenticeships with local auto mechanics to empower young women in Kenya, drafted laws to protect journalistic freedoms in Kosovo, started taxi services to combat sexual harassment and assault in Iraq, participated in protests at Tahrir Square, defended the legal rights of minority populations in Israel, helped organize academic exchanges in Palestine, and founded NGOs to ensure women’s voices are heard during transition in Tunisia.


 Perhaps the most valuable thing the WPSP can offer is connecting these women to one another. The Seven Sisters have a legacy of maintaining powerful networks among women, and this somewhat intangible asset is a unique way to offer our resources to women who are changing their own communities in the ways in which Wellesley encourages its students to. Delegates got the best and worst of the Wellesley experience- dining hall food and all- but the strong sense of community and ‘sisterhood,’ however trite that sounds, is one I think all Wellesley alums can appreciate. After all, there is no better place for cementing friendships than a dance party in the pub, another Wellesley experience WPSP delegates shared. For me certainly, and I hope for each other as well, the 2012 delegates will always be what one speaker, Lani Guinier, called a “network of accountability”: the people who will never let you settle into complacency. Who will always push you, by example or otherwise, to take chances, to try harder and to never forget what matters.


Wellesley’s 2012 Institute is just the first of many WPSP initiatives, including upcoming events in Bangladesh and France. The WPSP itself will move to the Wilson Center where it will reside permanently as part of the Global Women’s Leadership Initiative directed by Wellesley Centers for Women’s Rangita de Silva de Alwis.


Yes, despite America’s abysmal rates of female leadership the WPSP focus remains international, and continued healthy criticism will hold this institution accountable, but from what I saw in June, the WPSP is in good hands and Wellesley should be proud to be a founding member


-Rebecca Turkington ‘12


(Photos by Emma Li ‘12) 
For identification purposes:
Top photo: right to left are speakers Dr. Moushira Khattab of Egypt, Dr. Haleh Esfandiari of Iran, Ambassador Michele Sison, Wellesley ‘81
Middle Left: delegates Alma Lama of Kosovo, Gauhar Kasymzhanova of Kazakhstan, Esra Akyol of Turkey
Middle Right: delegates Hayfa Rouas of Morocco, Khitam Naamneh of Israel, Howaida Nagy Mohamed of Egypt, and Bouthaina Attal of Yemen
Bottom: delegates Sumaira Ishfaq of Pakistan and Jackcilia Ebere of South Sudan

July 13, 2012

Blowing out my wishes blowing out my dreams,
Just sitting here and trying to decipher what’s written in Braille upon my skin.

July 13, 2012
itsjohnsen:

A five-year-old Anne Frank stands on the steps of her father’s office. Amsterdam, 1934. Otto Frank

itsjohnsen:

A five-year-old Anne Frank stands on the steps of her father’s office. Amsterdam, 1934.
Otto Frank

(via coolchicksfromhistory)

3:42am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z6cAQxOXIS-Q
  
Filed under: Anne Frank history 
July 8, 2012

"Every once in a while, it’s necessary for people to know that we’re human, we have human experiences."

Prison choir first to compete in 2012 World Choir Games (by Interkultur1)

July 1, 2012
"Whatever you choose, however many roads you travel, I hope that you choose not to be a lady. I hope you will find some way to break the rules and make a little trouble out there. I also hope you will choose to make some trouble on behalf of women."

— Nora Ephron in her 1996 commencement address at Wellesley College

(Source: new.wellesley.edu)

June 29, 2012
anachronistique:


I heard a peal of delight and turned around — that’s the picture at the top of this post. Hilary Matfess, a young policy analyst, was jumping up and down, yelling out details.
“The mandate is constitutional! It was upheld! Roberts went for the swing vote! Yes! Oh my God! The individual mandate survives as a tax!”
Did you work on passing the bill? I asked.
“No!” said Matfess. “I just have lupus!”

- David Weigel at Slate

anachronistique:

I heard a peal of delight and turned around — that’s the picture at the top of this post. Hilary Matfess, a young policy analyst, was jumping up and down, yelling out details.

“The mandate is constitutional! It was upheld! Roberts went for the swing vote! Yes! Oh my God! The individual mandate survives as a tax!”

Did you work on passing the bill? I asked.

“No!” said Matfess. “I just have lupus!”

- David Weigel at Slate

(Source: Slate, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

June 29, 2012
"One of the factors a country’s economy depends on is human capital. If you don’t provide women with adequate access to healthcare, education and employment, you lose at least half of your potential. So, gender equality and women’s empowerment bring huge economic benefits. The 2010 global gender gap report by the World Economic Forum shows that countries with better gender equality have faster-growing, more competitive economies. Norway and some other European countries has a 40% quota for female board members, and now after five years the boards’ performance is better than among companies without a female quota. And the FAO [the UN Food and Agriculture Organization] shows that 54% of farmers in the developing world are women. If these women had access the same access as men to resources like credit, water, technological support and storage capacity, it would increase the food production by up to 4%. That could reduce the number of hungry people in the world by 100-150 million. So, there are big economic benefits … Gender equality is the right thing to do, but it’s also a smart thing to do."

— Michelle Bachelet, Chile’s first female president and the Executive Director of UN Women

June 29, 2012

(via feyminism)

June 28, 2012
Supreme Court Year in Review: Justice Scalia is upset about illegal immigration. But where is his evidence?

Dear Walter and Dahlia,

I have read Arizona v. United States and was particularly struck by Justice Scalia’s opinion dissenting from the part of the decision that invalidated several provisions of the Arizona law.

Justice Scalia is famously outspoken. Is that a good thing for a Supreme Court justice to be? Good or bad, it seems correlated with an increasing tendency of justices to engage in celebrity-type extrajudicial activities, such as presiding at mock trials of fictional and historical figures (was Hamlet temporarily insane when he killed Polonius? Should George Custer be posthumously court-martialed for blowing the Battle of the Little Big Horn?). My own view, expressed much better by professor Lawrence Douglas of Amherst, is that such activities give a mistaken impression of what trials are good for. But I would give Justice Sotomayor a pass for appearing on Sesame Street to adjudicate a dispute between two stuffed animals.


But that is to one side of Justice Scalia’s opinion.

Read More

(Source: Slate)

June 28, 2012
motherjones:

current:

The Affordable Care Act has been upheld, with the individual mandate “reasonably characterised as a tax.” Thank you, Chief Justice Roberts, for your deciding vote. 

Numbers, people. Real numbers, real people.

motherjones:

current:

The Affordable Care Act has been upheld, with the individual mandate “reasonably characterised as a tax.” Thank you, Chief Justice Roberts, for your deciding vote.

Numbers, people. Real numbers, real people.

(via inothernews)